RSSBlog

What We’ve Been Reading

What We’ve Been Reading

| March 2021
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Welcome to our roundup of news and current events related to ethics and international affairs! Here’s some of what we’ve been reading this past month.

Read More

Deconstructing the Narratives of the Interim National Security Guidance

| March 2021
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

The Biden/Harris administration has released its interim national security strategic guidance, which is meant to supersede the Trump/Pence administration’s 2017 National Security Strategy in providing direction to the executive departments and agencies of the U.S. government. For the past three years, the program on U.S. global engagement has focused on the question of overarching narratives […]

Read More

Measuring Morality in Foreign Policy: Joseph Nye’s Criteria

| February 2021
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Writing in the winter/spring 2019 issue of the American Oxonian, Joseph Nye wrestles with the question: how do we measure the morality of a President’s foreign policy? He notes, “Americans constantly make moral judgments about presidents and foreign policy, but we are seldom clear about the criteria by which we judge a moral foreign policy.” […]

Read More

What We’ve Been Reading

What We’ve Been Reading

| February 2021
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Welcome to our roundup of news and current events related to ethics and international affairs! Here’s some of what we’ve been reading this past month.

Read More

Revisiting the Ethical Calculus: Which Obligations Take Precedence?

| January 2021
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Five years ago, I posed a question which continues to have relevance today. This evening, President Joe Biden is signing executive orders returning the United States to the Paris climate accords and to take other steps to reverse actions taken by his predecessor which were based on an “America First” calculus. Yet, as the new […]

Read More

Jon Finer and the Doorstep

| January 2021
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Jon Finer, who has been nominated to serve as the deputy national security advisor in the Biden/Harris administration, gave an interview with GlobalBrief in 2020. He was asked about the impact of domestic politics and trends on U.S. foreign policy formulation. Finer’s response is worth perusing: In some ways, the traditional divide between American foreign […]

Read More

Can Staying at Home be Saving Lives and Avoiding Killing? COVID-19, Lockdowns and the Doing/Allowing Distinction

Can Staying at Home be Saving Lives and Avoiding Killing? COVID-19, Lockdowns and the Doing/Allowing Distinction

| December 2020
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Lockdown and its purpose have been summarized in five words that have echoed from the mouths of politicians, public health bodies, and social media accounts of large companies and private citizens: “Stay at home. Save Lives.” This essay argues that some lockdown measures are neither standard cases of saving nor standard cases of refraining from doing harm.

Read More

How Will the Biden Administration Adjudicate a Clash of Values?

| December 2020
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Simplistic assessments of U.S. foreign policy like to paint the policy divide BETWEEN values and interests. The reality is that policy often must choose between different and competing values. Last month, we noted the “ethical tensions” emerging between different camps that will most likely comprise the Biden/Harris administration’s national security team. Writing in Politico, Nahal […]

Read More