RSSEnvironment, Climate Change, Sustainability

Globalizing Responsibility for Climate Change

| April 2011
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In distributing the costs associated with climate change, most scholars have focused exclusively upon mitigation burdens. Few consider the distribution of adaptation costs, which concern projects that seek to minimize harm from human-induced climate change.

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Face Reality? After You!–A Call for Leadership on Climate Change

| April 2011
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Humanity’s so far leaderless approach to dealing with rapidly accelerating climate change
embodies a profoundly tragic catch-22 that has, among other twists
and contradictions, transmuted justice into paralysis.

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The Politics of Carbon Leakage and the Fairness of Border Measures

| December 2010
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It is possible to design fair border measures that address carbon leakage, are consistent with the leadership responsibilities of developed countries, do not penalize developing countries, and ensure that consumers take some responsibility for the emissions outsourced to developing countries.

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The Ethical Implications of Sea-Level Rise Due to Climate Change

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Does humanity have a moral obligation toward the estimated millions of individuals who will be displaced from their homes over the course of this century primarily due to sea-level rise as the earth’s climate warms? What form should these actions take?

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Human Rights Versus Emissions Rights: Climate Justice and the Equitable Distribution of Ecological Space

| November 2007
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Arguing that issues of both emissions and subsistence should be comprehended within a single framework of justice, the proposal here is that this broader framework be developed by reference to the idea of “ecological space.”

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Some Worries about Ecological-Humanitarian Intervention and Ecological Defense

| September 2007
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Eckersley’s arguments for pre-emptive ecological-humanitarian intervention and ecological defense are intriguing. However, the delicacy of these scenarios requires careful attention to the feasibility and overall benefits of the usage of military force in the prevention of crimes against nature.

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Ecological Intervention in Defense of Species

| September 2007
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Though there is much to engage with throughout the article, I shall only focus on one small part of it: the viability of military or legal intervention, in cases that are tentatively described as “crimes against nature.” This is due to the difficulties posed by a non-anthropocentric and non-instrumental approach.

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Ecological Intervention and Anthropocene Ethics

| September 2007
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Robyn Eckersley’s elegant and eloquent argument concerning the limits of “ecological intervention” is constrained by the scope of what is included in her definition of environmental emergency, by what might be in need of protection, and also by what is conventionally understood by notions of intervention related to states and sovereign territory.

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