RSSGlobal Governance

“Utopian in the Right Sense”: The Responsibility to Protect and the Logical Necessity of Reform

| September 2017
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In this article, Aidan Hehir writes that claims made about the success of the Responsibility to Protect (RtoP) echo the pejorative conceptions of “utopianism” as advanced by E. H. Carr and Ken Booth. In order to revive RtoP, Hehir suggests a potential reform of the existing international legal order that meets Carr’s preference for normative thinking that is “utopian in the right sense.”

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Yvonne Terlingen on the UN Secretary-General Selection Process

Yvonne Terlingen on the UN Secretary-General Selection Process

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In this interview, Yvonne Terlingen discusses the recent reforms to the UN secretary-general selection process, including the role of civil society in the reforms. She also details how the recent reforms may affect gender parity in senior posts across the UN.

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A Better Process, a Stronger UN Secretary-General: How Historic Change Was Forged and What Comes Next

A Better Process, a Stronger UN Secretary-General: How Historic Change Was Forged and What Comes Next

| June 2017
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In the past, UN secretaries-general were chosen on the basis of a haphazard and secretive process behind closed doors. Yet over the last two years, the UN forged dramatic change and created a more open, transparent, and inclusive selection process. This essay explores why and how reform finally happened, and what comes next.

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Trials as Messages of Justice: What Should Be Expected of International Criminal Courts?

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After more than a decade of work, the accomplishments of the International Criminal Court are highly contested. In this article, the authors ask, what can and should we expect from international criminal courts? How can international trial and punishment constitute a suitable response to episodes of mass violence?

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Should International Courts Use Public Reason?

| September 2016
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Is public reason an appropriate ideal for international courts? Since the early 1990s various political philosophers and legal scholars have argued that supreme courts should “use public reason” or abide by an “ideal of public reason.”

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Climate Contributions and the Paris Agreement: Fairness and Equity in a Bottom-Up Architecture

| September 2016
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Ethical questions of fairness, responsibility, and burden-sharing have always been central to the international politics of climate change and efforts to construct an effective intergovernmental response to this problem.

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Conflict in Ukraine: The Unwinding of the Post–Cold War International Order

Conflict in Ukraine: The Unwinding of the Post–Cold War International Order

| March 2016
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Rajan Menon and Eugene Rumer try to make sense of the Ukraine crisis for a general audience. The book’s major contribution lies in its attempt to provide what the authors term a “first cut at explaining the context, causes, and consequences” of a crisis that is still very much underway.

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